Return to the Rainbow Forest

Last weekend I went to Livingstone with the other SALTers. I did not bring my camera, preferring to not ruin another one, but the occasion seems appropriate to post the pictures I took one the previous trip, with the other three Zambia SALTers and two South Africa SALTers, who got special permission to come north and meet up with us.

In November, we walked across those rocks. The ones with the water rushing over them.

In November, we walked across those rocks. The ones with the water rushing over them.

Much of the time, there was mist obscuring the falls, but occasionally the wind blew the mist away enough that we could see them.

Much of the time, there was mist obscuring the falls, but occasionally the wind blew the mist away enough that we could see them.

View from the Knife Edge Bridge, with the falls behind me.  See the double rainbow?

View from the Knife Edge Bridge, with the falls behind me. See the double rainbow?

The entire area around the falls was a bright, verdant green that is not really captured by my semi-misted camera.  Most of Zambia is very green in rainy season, but the foliage here, under a constant gentle sprinkle, made the rest of Zambia look dry by comparison.

And again.The entire area around the falls was a bright, verdant green that is not really captured by my semi-misted camera. Most of Zambia is very green in rainy season, but the foliage here, under a constant gentle sprinkle, made the rest of Zambia look dry by comparison.

Much of the area was under constant downpour.  Many of the paths and railings were covered in some slimy algae-thing.  This one had a small waterfall running down it.

Much of the area was under constant downpour. Many of the paths and railings were covered in some slimy algae-thing. This one had a small waterfall running down it.

Most lookout points were in fact stand-and-get-drenched-while-staring-at-mist points.  I brought my poncho, which kept my shirt mostly dry, and a few portions of my skirt.

Most lookout points were in fact stand-and-get-drenched-while-staring-at-mist points. I brought my poncho, which kept my shirt mostly dry, and a few portions of my skirt.

After soaking ourselves in the spray, we walked down the path (better known as ‘really long staircase’) to the Boiling Pot, which we’d missed the first time. We had adventures with baboons, which is a story better told in person, and more-or-less dried in the sun.

Note: The next three pictures aren’t mine, they’re Shawnti’s; my camera was unhappy by this point, although it had not quite gotten to the stage of total nonresponsiveness.

Tithonia and bridge to Zimbabwe.  There was Tithonia all over the place during rainy season; I enjoyed it very much.

Tithonia and bridge to Zimbabwe. There was Tithonia all over the place during rainy season; I enjoyed it very much.

Path to the Boiling Pot.

Path to the Boiling Pot.

Curtains of mist would waft across the Boiling Pot, possibly damping tourists sitting on the rocks before dissippating.  I found them gorgeous.

Curtains of mist would waft across the Boiling Pot, possibly damping tourists sitting on the rocks before dissipating. I found them gorgeous.

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